Smorgasbord: Week of May 22


By Ranveig (Uploaded by Pete, on 14 May 2005) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
I took a break for the extended Memorial weekend. Here’s a belated few items of interest from over the last week in the world of ed news.

Some depressing statistics on college remediation

“not only will most students fall short of a degree — about 40 percent nationally who started community college in 2010 earned a credential in six years — but also that 80 percent of the school’s incoming students each year are assigned to remedial classes, according to administrators.”

When $7B in Remediation Falls Short: The Broken Promises Colleges Make to Students Who Need More Help, the74

More backstory on the Central Park East conflict that led to the principal’s ouster

“To the minority of parents who supported Garg, the controversy only exposed existing tensions at the school — issues that preceded Garg and remain after her departure.

“What you hear in every meeting — ‘that’s not how we did it before,’” said Laura Lugo, a first-year parent at the school who supported Garg.

She said teachers, and some parents, seemed to hold the traditions of the school so dear that they were resistant to change or to meeting the needs of families who were not progressive school purists — such as some parents supporting Garg’s idea of a test-prep program after school.”

Interesting demonstration of how sometimes being inflexibly “progressive” really means being reactionary.

More to this story, for sure.

With Principal Out, a School Community Faces Lingering Tensions, WNYC

An analysis shows that 4th graders aren’t learning much science

Which surprises no one who knows what curriculum actually looks like in most elementary schools.

4th Graders Are Getting ‘Thin’ Diet of Science Instruction, Analysis Shows, ED Week

One wonders how closely former Success Academy lawyer’s charter will hew to the SA mold?

That Emily Kim, a “top lawyer” at SA is leaving to start her own charter is interesting in two ways:

1) It puts SA’s ideal of competition as the best source of educational improvement to the test.

2) If Kim does not adhere to the SA mold in terms of disciplinary practices and test-prep focus, then this could be read as a censure of SA practices.

So worth watching to see what happens here.

Success Academy’s top lawyer is leaving — to start her own charter schools, Chalkbeat NY

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