Smorgasbord: Week of May 29


Photo von de:Benutzer:Rmarte und für GFDL freigegeben nach commons verschoben von Ixitixel

Ruby Bridges on our “moral obligation” for school integration

“Change won’t happen if we keep children separated. So it’s crucial that schools are integrated.”

Half a century after integrating a New Orleans school, Ruby Bridges says America is headed in the wrong direction, Chalkbeat NY

Integration advocates call for NYCDOE to take action

I am one of the signatories on the letter. I signed as a Policy Fellow with America Achieves, but please note that my views do not necessarily reflect that of America Achieves.

Advocates call on Chancellor Fariña to take ‘morally necessary’ steps to end school segregation, Chalkbeat NY

City Councilmen Brad Lander and Ritchie Torres sign on to letter calling for citywide plan to desegregate schools, Chalkbeat NY

Connor Williams on the need to carefully design systems of school choice to buffer against privilege

“Look: If we set up a system that sorted students with higher weight and/or blood sugar levels into higher-quality schools, I assure you that privileged families would start feeding their children lard milkshakes for breakfast, with cotton candy on the side.”

Williams: The D.C. Enrollment Scandal Shows How Critical It Is to Guard Against Parent Privilege, the74

Traditional schools put up barriers against the highest needs kids, too

“Would that Burris worried as much about traditional schools that are working hard to keep out poor kids of color.

Across the country, public schools, unfortunately, are re-segregating.”

Tucker Haynes: Proof That Charters Offer Excellence to All Children Goes Beyond U.S. News’s Top 10 Ranking, the74

The correlation between conservatives and Eva Moskowitz

This piece picks at some knots about Success Academy that I’ve gnawed at myself: namely that Moskowitz’s laser focus on a meritocracy at all costs creates both extreme results and controversy. It is that she is so pragmatically focused on merit and achievement that endears her to conservatives.

Incidentally, I think this piece highlights the problem with making education such a dramatically partisan political issue. Moskowitz is a pragmatic leader and she gets results, however one may disagree with her methods. I don’t like her political maneuvering, such as pretending that her schools are “public” but then keeping her curriculum private, but I admire her chutzpah and there is clearly something to learn from her operations. I can say this both as someone who is liberal and who is deeply skeptical of her approach.

When it comes to practice — school leadership, pedagogy, and curriculum — knee-jerk partisanship doesn’t often lead to real learning; instead, our hastiness to confine ourselves to one side or the other seems only to result in a blind commitment to failure.

Paul Ryan’s Favorite Charter School, Politico

A smart op-ed pushing back on partisan posturing against school funding

School funding matters. Saying this doesn’t make you a union hack.

You’re Not an ‘Interest Group’ Just Because You Believe School Funding Matters, the74

Matthew DiCarlo points to the continuing problem with most ESSA accountabilty systems

He outlines the distinction between “status” and “growth” measures, and notes that most states are just mixing the two will-nilly, with little understanding of what they actually measuring.

Improving accountability measurement under ESSA, Flypaper

Even the winners are losers in Trump’s budget proposal

“While Appalachia would receive $80 million from the new infrastructure fund, it would lose $120 million through deep cuts in the Appalachian Regional Commission, a state-federal partnership that funds a variety of development projects in the economically rough region. It would also lose the region’s share of a $90 million pilot project to use Abandoned Mine Lands Fund dollars to support reclamation efforts tied to economic development.

Cuts or eliminations of $855 million are also proposed for USDA programs that support business development, job training, water treatment plants, electricity and communications infrastructure, and community facilities. Another $680 million in salaries and expenses would be eliminated from the Rural Development program area or shifted to other parts of USDA, according to the White House budget document.”

TRUMP BUDGET SLASHES RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT PROGRAMS, The Daily Yonder

Dual-language programs are more effective for ELLs, yet they are few and far between

“Dual-language schooling closes the academic achievement gap… This is the only program for English learners that fully closes that gap”

Unmentioned in this article: dual-language programs also can serve as an enticement to families who want their children to learn Spanish — which can help to diversify our segregated schools.

ENGLISH LEARNERS: STRUGGLING CT SCHOOLS IGNORE A PROVEN PATH, The Mirror

Los Angelos votes to maintain zoning barriers (and segregation)

The deciding vote was cast by Assemblymember Tony Thurmond, whose core argument, tellingly, was “Can we take some time to understand the impact on districts?”

. . . time and time again, we see that while Sacramento politicians are quick to praise the virtues of “local” control, they really mean “district control” and are more worried about protecting the system as it exists right now than affording families that opportunity to get a great education for their children.

When Kids Can’t Attend the Great School Just Across the Street: We Must Break Down the Invisible Walls, the74

Saying no to kids is about harnessing positive effects of scarcity – but those effects are most likely only positive when there’s a base of abundance

An op-ed in NY Times makes the relatively germane argument that we should say no to our kids so they’re not spoiled, but adds the twist of two research studies to suggest that scarcity can make our kids more resourceful.

Makes sense to me, but I think it’s important to bear in mind here that research on scarcity shows much more than such positive takeaways. In a book on the subject, Scarcity, by Eldar Shafir and Sendhil Mullainathan, the authors lay out a wider body of research that suggests that experiencing scarcity also tends to make us operate with tunnel-vision to the detriment of our long-term goals and planning.

So in thinking about advice for how to raise your kids, how about this: if you already have a base of relative abundance, then allow your kids to experience bouts of scarcity. But if you live in scarcity on a daily basis . . . Well, let’s hope this universal basic income becomes a thing.

To Raise Better Kids, Say No, NY Times

The problem with personalized learning

“it’s easy for schools caught up in these sweeping changes to lose sight of what will really push student learning forward: high-quality, challenging, rich content.”

The author could have stopped right there.

Betheny Gross — The Key to Effective Personalized Learning: Rigorous Content, Standards, and Experiences, the74

And this surprise performance wasn’t even a good Iris Chacón impersonation

“Then he dropped to the ground and began to writhe on floor. He rolled onto his back, spread his long legs and flashed his white underwear to the shrinking crowd.

Morales’ 10-year-old son, J.D., said he was uncomfortably surprised by what he saw.

“I saw her doing things like sticking her legs out and shaking her bottom and it felt weird,” said the boy. “I don’t know why they would do that for an elementary school.””

. . . “I left the show the minute he started sticking his tongue out. I had my children with me and I wasn’t going to allow them to see that,” the irate mom said. “It was a very poor presentation of Iris Chacón, anyway. She was not like that.”

Parents ‘horrified’ after man performs surprise drag show at Manhattan school talent event, NY Daily News

Cities where teachers can be a big fish in a small pond

Malcolm Gladwell’s book, “David and Goliath,” makes the point that to be successful, starting out in the biggest and best universities and companies may not always be the best game plan, and that in fact, it can be much more effective to be a big fish in a smaller pond.

Along the same lines, a comparison of cities for cost-of-living and salary and other factors finds that for teachers, smaller cities, mostly in the Midwest, offer opportunities to be those bigger fish.

New Report Names the Best Cities to Live in if You’re a Teacher, Ed Week

Daniel Willingham blasts Eric Barker’s claim that valedictorians just “follow orders” and are unsuccessful later in life

“Maybe the book is better. If so, this is a case of careless reporting. Either way, it’s a case of careless thinking.”

I should note I’m a fan of Barker’s wide-ranging posts and enjoy his newsletters (http://www.bakadesuyo.com). But when reading this piece, I was disappointed to see Barker’s blithe statement that “School rewards people who follow the rules, not people who shake things up.” This is typical anti-public ed Silicon Valley tripe.

So I am glad to see Willingham challenge these “research-based” claims.

Valedictorians, disruptors, and sloppy thinking, Daniel Willingham’s blog

Dogs provide emotional support in schools

“As incongruous as it might seem to have a dog wandering the halls, Carmen Fariña, the New York City schools chancellor described it as a very successful program, and one the city could expand if other schools were interested in having a “nonperson” in the building.”

Where the Teacher’s Pet Sleeps in a Dog Bed, NY Times

This made me recall an earlier NY Times piece (What Does a Parrot Know About PTSD?) about rescued birds and how they could bond with war veterans suffering from PTSD.

Maybe we need more birds in schools, too. After all, they are already being used to enliven nursing homes . . .

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