Smorgasbord: The Opportunity Costs of Education


What people in the ed world are saying about Charlottesville

How the education world is reacting to racist violence in Charlottesville — and to Trump’s muted response, Chalkbeat

Schools need more embedded mental health support, like this

I’ve seen firsthand just how powerful a strong team of social workers and counselors can be on kids. So many of the issues that manifest in something like an IEP or a major academic slump or behavioral outburst in the classroom can be traced to underlying psychological or social-emotional factors. With daily support and care, kids that are dealing with a lot at home and in the streets can find sustenance and succor at school that will pay dividends into the future.

‘I just started flowing. It was the only thing that helped’, Politico

What if our system of education works exactly as intended?

Smart questions from Derrell Bradford:

“…let’s assume there are lots of interests, including student achievement, that intersect in schools. Which are most important to you? Are you OK with where minority student achievement ranks against, say, the value of property? Is the maintenance of a segregated system that prioritizes the interests of those who can cluster in the wealthiest areas more important to you than whether a young child of color has the early reading intervention necessary to unlock a future of possibility?”

Bradford: A Free Education System Bought and Sold on the Housing Market, as It Was Intended to Be, The 74

Growing up in a rural community has benefits for poor kids

“Children growing up in poor families in three out of four rural counties have higher incomes than the national average at age 26 simply as a result of spending time in these communities.”

Based on Raj Chetty’s work.

The Rural Advantage: Rural Upbringing Raises Kids’ Future Earnings, Study Shows, The Daily Yonder

Is it easier to think conservatively?

“According to previous research, inherent explanations come to our minds more easily than extrinsic ones. Considering the many external factors that play a role in an individual’s success or failure requires considerable cognitive effort. In contrast, “those people are simply like that” is a simple idea to process—a way to make a reasonable-seeming snap judgment and move on.

If your tendency is to simply go with that initial explanation, you will find yourself in sync with conservative values, including the idea that society is basically fair, and people get what they deserve.”

Really interesting to consider the implications of this. But I also think we need to be conservative about making sweeping generalizations from a few studies. I’m pretty sure that a study could be designed that would demonstrate some lazy thinking on the part of liberals as well.

Perhaps the one thing that can universally be stated about human beings is that we are biased towards less thinking, rather than more.

The Subtle Bias That Underlies Our Ideological Leanings, Pacific Standard

The opportunity costs of integrating schools

“Ending segregation isn’t a matter of workshops, rallies or even political lobbying. It’s deciding to value integration enough to pay its opportunity cost.”

Mike Antonucci highlights the big problem about how liberals talk about fighting segregated schools. We’re all happy to talk the talk until the moment comes when we need to sacrifice something.

As I’ve pointed out elsewhere, this becomes most visible in the choices that liberal parents make about where they send their kids to school and what neighborhoods they live in.

On Segregation, Sacrifice and Scolding Both Sides, Intercepts

Government sponsored behavioral nudges appears to work

We’ve looked at nudges here before.

Here’s evidence they work.

“In multiple areas, nudges have a much bigger impact, per dollar spent, than more traditional approaches, such as subsides, taxes and education.”

Governments are trying to nudge us into better behavior. Is it working?, Association for Psychological Science

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